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a sentence is left out before the if-clause because we could know clearly what is omitted. With an empty stomach, there is no food to mix. The muscles mix up only the acids. This makes more noise than if food was being mixed with the acids. The noise sounds like growling. -- This makes more noise than if food was being mixed with the acids. -- This sentence makes me wonder whether a sentence is left out before the if-clause because we could know clearly what is omitted. -- This makes more noise than if food was being mixed with the acids, (this makes noise). I think the sentence in parenthesis is left out. Is it right? Please help me! Thanks! ^ ^
Feb 21, 2014 11:31 PM
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Answers · 1
No. The phrase in parentheses does not belong at the end of the sentence. What the sentence is actually saying is: [The stomach muscles mixing only acids] makes more noise than if food was being mixed with the acids. The "if" is just being used to show that the clause following it is hypothetical or counterfactual. Food is not being mixed with the acids, but IF IT WERE it would not be as loud.
February 22, 2014
Anotherworld
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English