Joanna Walach
bring about/bring on Hey, I am revising phrasal verbs and I cannot catch the difference between bring about and bring on? Could you eplain me what is the difference between both. Thanks in advance
Jul 30, 2014 3:39 PM
Answers · 8
'To bring on' means 'to cause', but usually something that may have occurred anyway. There is also a certain sense of immediacy: 'The cold night I spent out in the rain a few days ago brought on a bout of flu.' 'To bring about' is more for cases where something is the direct cause of something else. The sense of immediacy is not so present by comparison: 'Changing social attitudes bring about changes to the law.' That's my personal interpretation though. Hope that helps:-)
July 30, 2014
Yes, I'd agree with Lukas about this. 'Bring on' is most used for health issues, and it is often something that might have occurred anyway. If an old person suffers from rheumatism, for example, this can be brought on by damp weather. Midwives can give expectant mothers drugs to 'bring on' labour if they are late in delivering. 'Bring about' is indeed less immediate, and refers to a more complex cause and effect situation, and a more complex set of conditions - such as the events which trigger a war, or the debate as to whether global warming has been 'brought about' by fossil fuel use. You couldn't possibly use 'bring on' for those situations.
July 30, 2014
hmmmm...for me it is the same:)
July 30, 2014
for example: is it right or not? Could you give me examples of correct sentences? Could you give me examples of typical using? Bring about - cause to happen something, powodować coś, wywoływać coś The crash of Malesyan plane brought about an avalanche of comments. I am afraid that the political situation in the Ukraine can bring about World War III.:( The huge unemployment in Poland brought about mass emmigration of Polish to many european and non-european countries. To bring about political change. bring on - cause usually sth unpleasant, spowodować The long period of wet weather brought on the epidemic of flu. Bad economic situation brought on a wave of bankrupts. The driver was so tired that he caused the accident on the street. He was a little reckless and he brought on many problems to his family. He was a little reckless and he brought on many problems to the lives of his family
July 30, 2014
Phrasal verbs have different meanings in different contexts. If you can give us some examples in sentences, we'll try to help you see the difference.
July 30, 2014
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