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What is "it" referring to? He proposed that an attitude is a mental and neural state of readiness, organized through experience, exerting a directive or dynamic influence upon the individual's response to all objects and situations with which it is related.
Aug 2, 2014 2:29 PM
Answers · 5
Although I'm a native English speaker, I struggled a little with this one. "It" refers to the "mental state of readiness". To help your understanding of why this is so, use the trick of removing parts of the sentence that don't change the structure of the sentence. For example, you can begin by removing subordinate clauses "organized through experience". Now try the sentence again: "He proposed that an attitude is a mental and neural state of readiness, exerting a directive or dynamic influence upon the individual's response to all objects and situations with which it is related." Still too complicated? Start removing other parts of the sentence, for example, remove "and neural", "or dynamic influence" and "and situations". You get: "He proposed that an attitude is a mental state of readiness, exerting a directive influence upon the individual's response to all objects with which it is related." Remove "He proposed that". You get: "An attitude is a mental state of readiness, exerting a directive influence upon the individual's response to all objects with which it is related." The sentence is still complicated, but now it is somewhat clearer that "it" refers to the "mental state of readiness". I hope this helps.
August 2, 2014
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