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How to use the word "JUST" in english ? How to use the word "JUST" in english, and I received this sentence ( Ohh. It's just hard for me to understand when we study the other way. ) I don't understand the use of "JUST" in this sentence, everyone explain me ?
Aug 2, 2014 6:21 PM
Answers · 5
"Just" is one of those really versatile words that has a lot of meanings. In your sentence, it is used to add emphasis: It is JUST hard for me.../It is REALLY hard for me... You could also use them together: It is JUST REALLY hard for me... For other uses and meanings of this word, I found this link that may be helpful: http://www.onestopenglish.com/community/your-english/word-grammar/your-english-word-grammar-just/156864.article Hope this helps.
August 2, 2014
In this sentence 'just' means the same as 'simply'.
August 2, 2014
Fixed Expressions with 'Just' Just is also used in several idiomatic and fixed expressions. Here are some of the most common: Just in time = Ready at the exact moment necessary In the business world many products are made 'just in time'. In other words, they are ready when a customer needs them and not before. Our supplier uses 'just in time' manufacturing to fill our orders. Using a just in time approach reduces our warehousing costs by 60%. Just off the boat = not experienced Someone who is 'just off the boat' is new to a situation and doesn't understand certain unwritten rules, or ways of behavior. Give him some time to adjust to the new position. Remember he's just off the boat and will need some time to get up to speed. They seemed as if they were just off the boat because they couldn't understand what was being asked of them. Just the ticket = Exactly what is needed 'Just' is used like 'exactly' when expressing something that is precisely what is needed in a situation. The two weeks off work was just the ticket. I feel like a new man. I think your ideas are just the ticket for our marketing campaign. Just what the doctor ordered = Exactly what is needed 'Just what the doctor ordered' is another idiomatic expression that expresses the idea that something precisely what is needed in a situation. I think his solution was just what the doctor ordered. The grammar review was just what the doctor ordered for getting students ready.
August 3, 2014
Just - as an Adverb... meaning 'Only' Just is also used as an adverb meaning 'only', 'merely', 'simply', and so on. Don't worry about breaking that cup. it's just an old, cheap thing. She said she just needed some vacation time to relax. He is just a low level manager, not the boss. Just - as an Adverb... meaning 'Exactly' Just is also used as an adverb meaning 'exactly' or 'precisely'. That's just the information I need to understand the situation. Alexander is just the person for the job. Just - as an Adjective... meaning 'Honest' Just is used as an adjective to mean that someone is honest, or fair (like the noun justice). He's a just man so you can expect to be treated well. You need to be just with all your students, not just the ones you like.
August 3, 2014
This may help.... The many uses of the word JUST The word just is an important word in English used in many different ways. Just can be used: as a time expression, to say that something is important, to emphasize words, as a synonym for 'only', and in a number of fixed expressions. Just - As a Time Expression Just = Recently Just is most often used to express that something has recently happened. Use just with the present perfect tense to indicate that an action has recently occurred and influences the present moment of speaking. I have just been to the bank. Tom has just arrived. Mary has just finished the report. Exception: American English vs. British English In everyday conversation American English uses just with the simple past tense, as well as the present perfect, to express that something recently happened. In British English, the present perfect is used. Just = Immediately Just can also be used as a time expression to mean that something important will happen immediately. In this case, use the present continuous tense or 'going to' to express that something is about to happen. He's just getting ready to go now. I'm just going to finish this and then we can go. Just = Close to the Time Just is also used to express that something happened at approximately to the time mentioned in phrases such as: just after, just before, just when, just as. I saw Tom just as he was leaving yesterday. Jennifer finished the report just as the boss asked her for it. Just when you think you've seen everything, something like this happens!
August 3, 2014
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