Jorge
Apprenticeships vs Interships I cannot tell the differences between them. In Spain we do not have differences for us both are the same. For instance: In the middle of my degree (during the second year) I have apprenticeships in a primary school ro how to deal with children for two months and a half but as you read, we haven,t finished our education so I di not know if this is apprenticeships or internships. What a riddle! Thanks
Aug 20, 2014 10:34 AM
Answers · 5
Hi Jorge, What you are describing is university work placement, or workplace experience/practice. An apprenticeship is a full-time job (1-4 years) with lower pay to learn how to do a job. Usually, an apprenticeship is only offered to school leavers (instituto) to learn a trade/skill/craft, or long term unemployed who need to start a new career. An internship is also full-time, but is unpaid. Usually lawyers in the US or UK will take an unpaid internship (1-2 years) so that they can work with the best professionals in their field, and they hope that when they finish the internship they will then be offered a fantastic job somewhere else because they had that experience.
August 20, 2014
The terms vary according to the English-speaking country concerned, but I definitely wouldn't use the word 'apprenticeship' for the situation you describe. You could call it a work placement, work experience or - the more American term - internship. An apprenticeship involves long-term training for a specific trade. Apprentices are usually employed by the company, and work either full- or part-time for a few years alongside more experienced employees. They will probably be paid a modest wage while they are training, and then paid a full wage/salary when they are qualified. This practice is common in Switzerland, for example.
August 20, 2014
An internship is a short-term placement in a particular business of institution to gain practical or workplace skills as part of a larger course of study. An apprenticeship is usually several years long, usually in a trade (like training to be a plumber, electrician or carpenter) and at the end of it you are qualified. Hope that helps with the definitions. In the example you give of spending time at a school during an education degree, I wouldn't use either of these words although "Internship" is closer in meaning. In Australia we call this a 'practical placement' (or "prac" for short). From a quick google, in the USA they might use "internship" more frequently for this idea.
August 20, 2014
Hi Jorge. A correction: Internships* Intern: An intern typically still explores his/her career options and is unpaid Apprentice: An apprentice typically knows which career he/she wants and is paid. Most people seem to use both terms, in a colloquial setting, interchangeably as the border between the two terms can be blurry at times. I hope this answer helps!
August 20, 2014
I am used to thinking of an apprenticeship as involving a long-term period learning a specific trade under the tutelage of a skilled worker in that field. I do not think it is applied often in modern times. An "internship" often amounts to a short-term assignment of a more general nature. Both are often unpaid.
August 20, 2014
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