Juan
The word GET Hello everybody, I have a question about what means the word GET before another word, for example: -Get going -Get alone -Get out of -Get over -Get through -Get carried away I know what means the words after GET but I want to know if I put GET before what change? Are there some rules about that?
Aug 25, 2014 12:26 AM
Answers · 7
The short answer is that the meaning of "get" changes depending on the following word. If you get a thing, you receive or even take it. If you get somewhere, you arrive at that place. If you get [adjective], it means you change to, or become the state of that adjective. Sometimes "get" is part of a phrasal verb, and therefore the phrasal verb has its own meaning. By the way, the phrase "what means" doesn't exist in native English - not in questions, not in statements. "What does ____ mean?" "I have a question about what the word GET means..." "I know what the words after GET mean..."
August 25, 2014
There are no rules for this sort of thing. These are all idiomatic expressions. The word "get" appears in very very many expressions. The ones you have found here, mean: -Get going = be on your way, leave. -Get alone - this is not really an expression. It could mean "be alone". -Get out of = leave a place or a situation ("get out of trouble") -Get over = forget about something or recover from a disease -Get through = endure or survive, ("he got through his divorce") -Get carried away = to let yourself be overcome with something.
August 25, 2014
Obter va,i Obter sozinho, Sai Obter, mais Obter através ,Obtenha Levado.
August 25, 2014
hmm it get might be like your spanish "ya" in adding emphasis. joe
August 25, 2014
Get = acquire, obtain, have, possess, achieve
August 25, 2014
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