May
Lo,la and le, all of them can mean "you", but what's the difference among them? Thanks! Lo,la and le, all of them can mean "you", but what's the difference among them? Thanks!
Dec 4, 2014 12:55 AM
Answers · 7
Lo = masculine ( Lo veo todos los días ) La = feminine ( La veo todos los días ) Le = neutral ( Le veo todos los días ) both masc/fem The usage depends on the Spanish-speaking country or speaker, it's a choice of preference.
December 4, 2014
Lo: Pronoun Direct Object, male Compro un coche = lo compro La: Pronoun Direct Object, female Compro una casa= la compro le: Pronoun Indirect Object, male or females Compro un coche a mi padre = le compro un coche
December 4, 2014
About le, this is another object, called indirect object. This OI is what recives in second place the action of the verb. And you can find it out many times asking (To who? instead of asking What?, as it was with the direct object). So for example: Juan lee el periodico a los alumnos. (John reads the newspaper to the students). Action: Read (leer) Receiving the action in first place (direct object): El periodico (The newspaper). Receiving the action in second place (indirect object): Los alumnos. So, indirect object can be replaced for 'le' or 'les', according to the person. In my example we would say: Juan les lee el periodico, (John reads the newspaper to them), because 'los alumnos is plural'. Now we don't have feminine or masculine, it will always be 'le or les', just singular and plural cases. If there were only women, and instead of 'los alumnos', we say 'las alumnas', still, Juan les lee el periodico, (John reads the newspaper to them). It will change only for singular form. Juan lee el periodico a Pedro or a Laura (John reads the newspaper to Pedro or to Laura), again doesn't matter the gender, it will be: Juan le lee el periodico (John reads the newspaper to him/her.). And, there are cases, were both the indirect and the direct object are replaced. In this cases, the indirect object always turns into 'Se'. Juan lee el periodico a los alumnos: Juan se lo lee. (los alumnos turned into 'se', and periodico into 'lo', notice we don't say 'les lo lee', this is wrong) Juan trae las herramientas para los trabajadores (John brings the tools for the workes) -> Juan se las trae. Juan da los discos a Laura (John gives the albums to Laura) -> Juan se los da Juan hace la comida para Pedro (John prepares the food for Pedro) -> Juan se la prepara. Hope it's clear :) Take care, Alejo.
December 4, 2014
Well, they don't mean 'you' :) There's something in Spanish called 'Objeto directo' (direct object). Which is a something, or somebody who receives the action of the verb in the sentence: 1. 'Juan lee el periódico' (John reads the newspaper) 2. 'Juan lee a Jorge Luis Borges' (John reads Jorge Luis Borges) So the action is to read, and you can ask yourself: 'What he's reading (or who)'. So the answer will be 'the newspaper', or 'Jorge Luis Borges'. This are direct object in those sentences. Then, direct objects can be replaced by what is called 'Pronombre personal átono' (something like Unstressed pronoun). They match in gender and number with the actual object or name that they replace: Lo for singular and masculine. La for singular and feminine. Los for plural and masculine. Las for plural and feminine. So if we replace the OD (direct object) in my examples, newspaper, or Jorge Luis Borges, are singular and masculine, so: 'Juan lo lee' (John is reading it, or John is reading him (in te case of Borges). Other example for plural and feminine: Juan trae las herramientas (John brings the tools) -> Juan las trae. Juan tiene los discos (John has the albums) -> Juan los tiene Juan hace la comida (John prepares the food) -> Juan la prepara. Hope this is clear. Take care, Alejo.
December 4, 2014
If you are using a verb that requires an accusative (direct object) then all the examples already provided by Juan Carlos apply. But if you are using a verb which requires a dative (indirect object) and an accusative (direct object) then they cannot be interchanged. Using a verb that requires an accusative: Yo le veo = "I see you" (formal), "I see him" and "I see her". Yo lo veo = "I see him". Yo la veo = "I see her". Using a verb that requires a dative and an accusative. In this case only "le" can refer to the dative (indirect object) and "lo" and "la" will refer to the accusative (direct object). Él no le dijo = "he did not tell you" (formal), "he did not tell him", "he did not tell her". Él no la dijo = "he did not say it" (in this case "la" refers to "what he did not say", since "it" is feminine, we can use the noun "la respuesta". So "la" refers to "la respuesta" not to the person who is being told the answer. Él no lo dijo = "he did not say it" (in this case "lo" refers to "what he did not say", since "it" is masculine, we can use the noun "el secreto". So "lo" refers to "el secreto" not to the person who is being told the secret. This happens because in Spanish there is NO NEUTRAL gender, only feminine and masculine genders. Thus anything that in Enlgish is "it" in Spanish will necessarily will have to be translated as "he" or "she", therefore the use of "la" and "lo" to describe this "it" in English. I hope this helps.
December 4, 2014
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May
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), Chinese (Other), English, French, Spanish
Learning Language
French, Spanish