Wind
You're not a vegetarian, aren't you? Which ones of the following are acceptable in the spoken English and do they mean the same thing? You're a vegetarian, are you? You're a vegetarian, aren't you? You're not a vegetarian, are you? You're not a vegetarian, aren't you? I think 1 and 2 mean the same thing, 1 is a bit softer. 3 means "You'd better not be a vegetarian" 4 sounds a bit odd to me. Am I right? Thanks.
Dec 7, 2014 1:28 AM
Answers · 1
You're basically right. 1) and 2) are the same. However, with 1), it sounds like something you just recently learned about the person. Whereas, with 2), you're confirming something you learned a while ago. A: I can't eat this hamburger. B: You're a vegetarian, are you? (B is assuming this as a new piece of information) A: Ah, I see you made vegetable soup! Thanks. B: (Well) You're a vegetarian, aren't you? (B knew this ahead of time) For 3), you would usually use that when you are confirming that someone does eat meat. It's not really "You'd better not be a vegetarian" (which is a little bit rude depending on the context). A: I only have steak. You're not a vegetarian, are you? A: My friends told me you like steak. You'd better not be a vegetarian! (or else, you should be mad at your friends - and it sounds a bit rude) 4) is incorrect.
December 7, 2014
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Wind
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English