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Scott
Is there differences in the Spanish language between the different Spanish speaking countries? Hi! I am starting to learn Spanish and I have heard before that the Spanish spoken in Spain for instance is somewhat different than South America. I was wondering if it would be a good idea to focus my partners to the same country or only a couple of countries (example: Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela) What do you all think? Thanks! Scott
Jun 6, 2015 2:56 PM
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Answers · 24
Of course, Spanish is spoken in many different places, so it's natural that there are lots of variations (in the same way that the English spoken in England is different from the English spoken in New York). However, they're not as different as many people think. I have no problems understanding someone from Latin America (we can guess the meaning of the words that are different, and the accent is not a barrier). Many of my students are more familiar with Latin American English, and yet they can perfectly understand me. There is no such thing as "neutral accent" in Spanish, as David has said (and if it existed, it would probably be either Colombian accent or Castilian Spanish accent). My suggestion: listen to the different accents and, at the time of speaking, stick to the one that you like the most, but try to get accustomed to all the variations so that you can understand Spanish in its may different forms.
June 6, 2015
It's not only the pronunciation but there are also words that mean other things even otherwise. - Ya no es solo la pronunciación oral, sino que también hay palabras que significan otras cosas incluso lo contrario.
June 6, 2015
Hi Scott, I've learned about some of the differences. In Spain, they use the "vosotros" verb forms which is largely not used in South America. I believe in South America they will use "ustedes" to refer to the plural "you". In some Latin American countries (ex. Colombia), they would pronounce "yo" as "jo" (soft j) and "ll" also with a sort of soft j sound, whereas in places like Bolivia or Cuba they would pronounce it "yo" (the way an English speaker would read it) and "ll" would sound kind of like "y". I believe this is the case in Bolivia because my mom grew up there and I learned to read Spanish in that latter way. Apparently Chile is known for speaking super fast and modifying their Spanish so that oftentimes the ends of words or maybe consonants are dropped. So many visitors find it difficult to understand with just basic Spanish! I am going with the strategy you asked about - trying to focus my studying to the Bolivia/Cuba way of speaking. I don't know if it's the best method, but I just don't want to get too confused right now. Of course, I am not a native speaker so any further clarification I'm sure would be welcome!
June 6, 2015
Hi Scott! Yes, there are a few differences, I don't know if you are learning Spanish from Spain or Spanish from Latin America, but since I studied Spanish from Spain, I can tell you that two of the biggest differences I have seen is 1) Pronounciation, in Latin America, the Z and C doesn't have a lisp, and they speak more rapidly and enunciate less. 2) -ais ending. In Spanish from Spain, the plural version of You often has a -ais ending. F.example: Donde estais? (Where are you). However -ais is never used in Latin America, they either stick to the -an ending or use Ustedes instead. Hope this helped :D
June 6, 2015
Por supuesto!! Yo vivo en el sur de España, y dentro de mi propia provincia puedes diferenciar de qué pueblo es la gente por su forma de hablar. Saludos
June 6, 2015
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Scott
Language Skills
English, Spanish
Learning Language
Spanish