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Wu Ting
How would you interpret the phrase “All of Henry Miller in fact”? The library has opened two days a week now. Evidently the polio germ takes a rest on Mondays and Fridays. Well, three cheers for the brave ladies who volunteered to preside over the crypt. Not a soul in the place, the perfect opportunity to walk about openly carrying Look Homeward, Angel and Tropic of Cancer without raising an eyebrow. All of Henry Miller in fact, I’ll take the whole pile, and Kinsey too. How would you interpret the phrase “All of Henry Miller in fact”? Does it mean in fact it is the perfect opportunity to walk about openly carrying all books of Henry Miller? Thanks. And this excerpt is taken from The Lacuna by Kingsolver.
Jun 23, 2015 3:16 AM
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Answers · 2
That is the correct interpretation. In this passage, "in fact" is there for emphasis. It is an indirect way of saying "all the books of Henry Miller."
June 23, 2015
The author is talking about walking around a library with specific books. By the context, I assume Henry Miller is an author, in which case "all of Henry Miller" means "all of the books by Henry Miller," and the same would then apply to "Kinsey".
June 23, 2015
Wu Ting
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, French
Learning Language
English