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arrest.charge.manage Do these sentences make sense ? And why can't the word between brackets be used instead? My secretary reminded. ( announced) me that I had a meeting. I had hardly started on my journey when...( nearly) I asked for directions ( direction) I finally managed to get back.( wad capable) I drove too fast and was arrested by the police.( charged) Thanks
Jul 8, 2015 2:35 PM
Answers · 3
These other words cannot be used because they are simply not interchangeable in meaning, or require different conjugations of verbs as a result. To remind someone is different than to announce to someone, because remind implies that it has already been said. To hardly have started, it means you have indeed started. Nearly, means you haven't yet started. Asking for directions is in the plural because to get to a place, generally requires a number of directions. It would be singular if it were as such: "Can I ask you what direction ___ is?" You can use "capable", but you'd have to change the sentence. "I was finally capable of getting back" - but this does not necessarily imply that you did in fact, get back. Thus the meaning is not the same. To arrest someone and to charge someone - these are two different processes of law and are not interchangeable.
July 8, 2015
Do these sentences make sense ? And why can't the word between brackets be used instead? My secretary reminded. ( announced) me that I had a meeting.< My secretary announced to me that I have a meeting to attend><you would have to restructure the sentence to use this word as it is not interchangeable. I had hardly started on my journey when...( nearly) I asked for directions ( direction) < they are just not interchangeable, hardly is more like barely. I had barely started on my journey when I asked for directions. I finally managed to get back.( wad capable)< this does not make any sense at all in brackets, the phrase is just fine with out being changes but what is typed in the brackets are not english words. I drove too fast and was arrested by the police.( charged) arrested means taken into custody, had cuffed and taken to jail detained indefinitely, charged means you have a charge against you, meaning they are claiming you have broken the law but you may or may not be detained. or arrested. Thanks
July 8, 2015
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