Amiret el jazayer
what is the difference between someone and somebody
Oct 5, 2008 6:48 AM
Answers · 7
SOMEONE 3 dictionary results for: someone Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source - Share This –pronoun > some person; somebody. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source - Share This some·one pronoun > An unspecified or unknown person. noun > A person of importance: He really thinks he's someone. WordNet - Cite This Source - Share This someone noun a human being; "there was too much for one person to do" [syn: person] SOMEBODY 4 dictionary results for: somebody Dictionary.com Unabridged –pronoun 1. some person. –noun 2. a person of some note or importance. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source - pronoun - An unspecified or unknown person; someone. See Usage Note at he1. noun - pl. some·bod·ies A person of importance: "Obviously she was somebody—a real presence in the room" (Oleg Cassini). CITE THIS SOURCE|PRINT WordNet - Cite This Source - noun a human being; "there was too much for one person to do" Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary - Cite This Source Some"bod*y\, n. 1. A person unknown or uncertain; a person indeterminate; some person. Jesus said, Somebody hath touched me. --Luke viii. 46. We must draw in somebody that may stand "Twixt us and danger." --Denham. 2. A person of consideration or importance. Before these days rose up Theudas, boasting himself to be somebody. --Acts v. 36.
October 12, 2008
Words ending in -one and -body mean the same : somebody=someone, anyone=anybody, no one=nobody, everyone=everybody. All are pronouns. So, your answer is: someone and somebody mean the same.
October 11, 2008
"Someone" is used as a pronoun. "Somebody" can be used as a pronoun , and as a noun, too. Ex.: He is somebody now. They thought they were somebodies. (a personality)
October 5, 2008
I think they are interchangeable. Look at some of lyrics to "Someone to watch over me" There’s a somebody I’m longin’ to see I hope that he, turns out to be Someone who’ll watch over me My feeling is that 'somebody' is used in the 1st line because it helps the meter of the song flow better (3 syllables vs 2). So the point is, the main difference in use would be for how it flows in music, poetry or even regular speech if you are that attuned.
October 5, 2008
heuuh thx for the explanation ^^ -I get that when we use someone it means that we're talking about a person as capacities, personnality or that we know simply -and when we use somebody it means that we're talking about a person as a human being is it that ?
October 5, 2008
Show more
Still haven’t found your answers?
Write down your questions and let the native speakers help you!