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Tomoko
What does it mean "literally "? or how can i use it? I live in London and people say this word a lot, what situation can i say this word for???
Jan 15, 2016 9:25 PM
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Answers · 4
Everyone that answered before me is correct. Just be aware that most people use it incorrectly. "He is literally a frog" means that what you are referring to is actually a frog (the animal). However, a lot of people would say the same thing, "He is literally a frog", but mean "He is metaphorically a frog" or "He is as ugly as a frog". So, this word is both slang and proper depending on how you decide to use it.
January 16, 2016
literally means exactly what the word or phrase been said means . She acted in the play as a princess ,but do you know she is a princess literally.> she is really a princess Could you lend me some money ? I cant because I am broke literally > He is not joking , He is really broke! She look like a cow, but it is not in the literal sense . > she look like a cow, but not really a cow
January 15, 2016
This is not an easy one, even native speakers don't use it correctly. The word "literal" refers to the precise, exact, scientific meaning of something as opposed to the figurative or poetic meaning behind something. "I'm starving" is an common expression meaning you're very, very hungry. "I am literally starving" means that you haven't eaten for many days and you are very sick, if not dying. "Adele is literally the greatest singer of all time" is something you might hear, but this sentence cannot be true in the real world. People say it this way for dramatic emphasis. The correct way to use the word would be, "I was literally the last person on the plane", meaning you weren't just *among* the last people, the door shut behind you. In English, this is how we indicate that we are not exaggerating or speaking figuratively.
January 15, 2016
Literally is synonymous with exactly, precisely. However, a lot of times in spoken English, it is used to give emphasis to a statement. For example: "There were literally a million people at my house last night." This is an exageration as the person didn't have one million people at their house, but it really emphasizes that there were a lot of people there.
January 15, 2016
Tomoko
Language Skills
English, Japanese
Learning Language
English