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Francisco A. A.
How do you express close future actions/events with verbs of motion in Russian? I'd like to know if the following sentences are correct and equivalent: a) Сегодня вечером мы поедем/пойдём в театр. b) Сегодня вечером мы едем/йдём в театр. As the event is not in a distant future, I wonder if it's possible to use the verbs идти/ехать instead of пойти/поехать and if it is usual in daily communication. Once I'm not stating how would I get there (on foot or by means of transportation), is it possible to use идти, even if I'm going by bus or by train? I've read that this is possible when the destination is not in another town or region.
Jan 25, 2016 9:14 PM
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Answers · 6
When talking about theatre we usually use the verb "идти" (it doesn't matter whether you are going on foot or by bus) unless you want to point out that you are going to use some kind of transport. Sentence a) corresponds to the English Future Simple used to express a spontaneous decision, a voluntary action or certainty. Sentence b) corresponds to the English Present Continuous used to express a planned activity.
January 26, 2016
if you're talking about agreements and planned future actions, as well as in English, you can use the present continuous (in Russian it's just present). Идти - it is used if for the movement you are using only your feet/ Ехать - This is used when you are using any form of transport - a bicycle, car, horse, carriage, etc. It does not depend on the distance. it just depends on the type of use of the vehicle, if it is
January 25, 2016
You can use both variants, because in most of situations your opponent know how you will get here (on foot or with help of transport) But "йдём" - there are no such word. True will be "идём"
January 25, 2016
Yes, both sentences are correct and equivalent. There are not mention of transport. But we can not say: "Сегодня вечером мы пойдем/идем в театр на машине" ! Я иду на автобусе/поезде/машине/самолете..... It is wrong! Always.
January 25, 2016
Hi, Francisco! Both sentences are correct. However, they are not 100% equivalent. The thing is the verbs with prefix "по-" (in 'a' sentence) literaly mean future action but with a shade of indefinity, uncertainty. In 'b' sentence the verbs are in Present tense, actually.....but we usully say so (I mean we speak about future using verbs in Present tense) when we are sure we're gonna do. So, if you wanna tell someone you're absolutely sure that tonight you go to the theatre, you have tickets on your hands, you should use 'b' sentence. If you not really sure, I mean you still could change your mind during the day, or the idea to go to the theatre appeared in you head just now, you'd probably use 'a' sentence. I hope it makes sence to you! But, please, keep in your mind that the difference discribed above becomes obvious when you think hard. In everyday life using both sentences is appropriate and mutually exchangeable, so it doesn't really matter which sentence you use.
January 26, 2016
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Francisco A. A.
Language Skills
English, German, Portuguese, Russian
Learning Language
English, German, Russian