Community Web Version Now Available
Emily
Difference between I'd like sb. to do and I'd like for sb. to do Hi, I just read a sentence: I'd like for you to get started with support materials. But is " I'd like sb. to do" also used? Is there any noticeable difference in meaning between the two? Thanks a lot.I wanted to say "somebody" here as in "sb. "
Jan 26, 2016 2:51 PM
10
0
Answers · 10
To "like for" is heard fairly often in the US, but never in the UK, at least in standard usage. I'm not sure if it reaches the level of standard usage in the US either, but my impression, possibly incorrect, is that most educated people would omit the "for" in careful writing.
January 26, 2016
I agree with the other members. Standard English is 'I'd like you to get started'. The other form, 'I'd like for you to get started' is a non-standard usage which only exists in North America. You might possibly have worked this out from the nationality of the answerers: Bill, from Britain, says that the 'for' version is wrong, David from the US says that it's fine, while James (an Englishman who lives in the US) says that it's common in the US but never heard in the UK. Me? I'm just a language nerd. The 'for' version sounds American to me, but it doesn't sound wrong. In fact it sounds quite nice, and old-fashioned, somehow.
January 26, 2016
Hi thanks a lot for your comments, I don't know how to edit the question title, but yes, I meant to say " somebody".
January 26, 2016
"sb" probably means "somebody", here. Bill, I see you are from the UK, as I was originally, and I agree native UK speakers wouldn't say this. However, per my other remark, US English native speakers might, in some circumstances at least.
January 26, 2016
Often "sb." is used in corrections as an abbreviation (short form) for "should be." To answer your question, "I'd like for you to get started with support materials" sounds fine.
January 26, 2016
Show More
Emily
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, Portuguese
Learning Language
English, Portuguese