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Is there any difference between these two sentences, or both just mean the same? We've lived in Tokyo for ten years. We've been living in Tokyo for the last ten years. Thanks.
Jan 27, 2016 7:05 PM
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Answers · 6
If you mean that you moved to Tokyo in 2006 and you still live there now, there is no difference in meaning. With the verbs 'work' 'live' and 'study', there really is no difference between the present perfect simple and the present perfect continuous. For example, 'I've worked here for six months' and 'I've been working here for six months' mean exactly the same thing. Saying 'for the last ten years' makes it clearer than just 'for ten years', but the extra words aren't really necessary - the time period is explicit with or without 'the last'. We know that you are talking about the ten-year period up to now.
January 27, 2016
There is a difference. The first sentence implies you no longer live in Tokyo. The second sentence implies you are still living in Tokyo.
January 27, 2016
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January 27, 2016
We've lived in Tokyo for ten years. (would be written) We've been living in Tokyo for the last ten years. (spoken, narrated) They have the same meaning.
January 27, 2016
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