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They have made movies since they finished college. When they graduated from college, Lisa and Amy started making movies together. They still make movies. 1) They have made five movies since they finished college. (the result is given 5 movies .) 2) They have been making movies since they finished college. (the emphasis on "have been making " without stopping on schedule and now They also doing the same) I can't say : They have made movies since they finished college. Because by the terms - They still make movies. action not finished, the result is not given. If I change the conditions by they broke up would I can say ? It's right? They have made movies since they finished college. ( Now they broke up. They don't make movies anymore. ) Thanks for help!
27 de ene de 2016 20:23
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Answers · 8
They HAD been making movies since they finished college till they broke up. ( all in the past)
27 de Enero de 2016
A slightly more natural phrasing of (1) would be: - They've made five movies [together] since finishing college. Adding "together" makes it clear that Lisa didn't (for example) make 3 and Amy make 2 movies with other people. If they no longer make movies: - They made five movies [together] after finishing college.
27 de Enero de 2016
For your first meaning, in which they are still making movies, I would say "They have been making movies". If the emphasis is on the result, then "They have made five movies ..." (so far, and it's open to more coming, possibly), is fine. If it's all in the past, and they no longer make movies, then simplest is "They made movies ...", but then you can't use "since", so it would be "... after leaving college".
27 de Enero de 2016
Artur
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