Community Web Version Now Available
ming
"He insisted on reading the letter." Had he started to read? "He insisted on reading the letter." Had he started to read? Or it is ambiguous . How should I express the meanings as "he insisted on getting start to read." and as "he insisted on continuing reading."
Jan 29, 2016 8:53 AM
4
0
Answers · 4
It is ambiguous. It doesn't say if he had started reading. The meaning would depend on the context, and in most cases it would then be clear. It doesn't necessarily make sense to try to interpret it out of context. "he insisted on getting start to read." is not grammatically correct. I assume you mean "He insisted on starting to read the letter". Or maybe "He insisted on opening and reading the letter". If he had started, you could say "He insisted on continuing reading the letter". More natural would be "He insisted on reading the rest of the letter" or "... the whole of the letter".
January 29, 2016
First of all, you should provide a context with this kind of question. He insisted on reading the letter - does not say whether he has eventually started to read the letter or not. It only says the he expressed his desire to do it. "he insisted on getting start to read.", "he insisted on continuing reading." - did not get your question here. Those sentences mean: He wants to begin with reading, he wants to continue reading. Do you want some other ways to say it?
January 29, 2016
ming
Language Skills
Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Spanish
Learning Language
Arabic, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Spanish