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Artur
Bill has run marathons since he was in high school. (It doesn't make sense?) Bill has been running marathons since since he was in high school. (the emphasis on has been running marathons, now he is running marathons too, but not at the moment of speaking - he usualy run marathons ) Present Perfect Continuos. If I say the same sentence in Present Perfect Simple should I add the result or not necessarily? For example: Bill has run 10 marathons since he was in high school. (the result for now 10 marathons) Bill has run marathons since he was in high school. (It doesn't make sense?) Bill is looking very tired. Where has he been? He has been running marathons. (now he isn't running) Thanks for help!
29 de Jan de 2016 às 15:01
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Answers · 4
PPS can be used with either a time (duration), or a result, or both Bill has run 10 marathons Bill has run marathons since high school Bill has run 10 marathons since high school ...but of course it sounds strange to just say "Bill has run marathons". Your example for present perfect continuous is excellent, so I don't think I need to explain that tense, but please don't hesitate to ask if anything is unclear. By the way, it's a spooky coincidence that the first person to answer your question was called Bill, right? ;-)
29 de Janeiro de 2016
Thank you Bill!
29 de Janeiro de 2016
You have just come to see that the Past is a bit different in English. "Bill has run marathons since he was in high school" makes perfect sense. He runs them and then he stops and then he runs another one, and so on. If it was Bill has been breathing since he was in high school. It makes sense Bill has been voting since he was in high school. It still makes sense
29 de Janeiro de 2016
Artur
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