Patricia
uses of GET I would like to know which are the differents uses of verb get Get, is a verb that it very hard to understand because the english people are use for many things.
Feb 1, 2016 1:41 PM
Answers · 7
'Get' on its own, as a main verb, has three basic meanings: 1. Become ---> It got dark/She got fat/We got tired 2. Obtain ---> I got this as a birthday present/ I went shopping and got some milk 3. Arrive ---> I got home late/ The parcel got here on Friday This third meaning is the basis of many verb+preposition or verb+adverb combinations, for or example, get up, get down, get through, get over, get out, get in, and so on. In some cases, the meaning is very clear and literal. For example: Get up = rise Get down = descend Get out = exit Get in = enter In other cases, such as 'I'll get around to doing it soon', the meaning is more idiomatic, and you have to learn the meaning of the phrase as a whole. 'Get' can also be used as an auxiliary verb: In the passive voice ----> He got killed = He was killed In causatives ---> I got him to help = I persuaded him/arranged for him to help
February 1, 2016
TO GET + PREPOSITION/ADVERB = PHRASAL VERBS WITH VARIOUS MEANINGS TO GET +Meaning Example to get at try to express I think I see what you're getting at. I agree. to get away with escape punishment for a crime or bad action I can't believe you got away with cheating on that test! to get by manage (financially) Sam doesn't earn much, but we get by. to get down depress, descend This rain is really getting me down. to get off leave a form of transport (train, bus, bicycle, plane) We got off the train just before the bomb exploded. to get on 1. enter/sit on a form of transport (train, bus, bicycle, plane) 2. have a relationship with someone 1. He got on his bicycle and rode down the street. 2. Amy and I really get on well. to get on with to proceed I have so much homework, I'd better get on with it. to get out of avoid doing something, especially a duty She got out of the washing-up every day, even when it was her turn. to get over recover (from an illness, a surprise) Have you gotten over your cold yet? to get through use or finish the supply of something We've got through all the sugar. Can you buy some more? to get up leave your bed He gets up at 6.00 a.m. every morning. to get up to do - usually something bad The children are very quiet. I wonder what they're getting up to. OTHER EXPRESSIONS WITH GET Do you get it means do you understand. Do you get what the teacher was explaining in class? He's getting dinner tonight means he's preparing the meal. You can relax. It's my turn to get dinner tonight. I'll get the bill means I'll pay. Put your wallet away! I'll get the bill. That really gets me! means that irritates me. It really gets me when my sister shows up late. To get rid of something means to throw it away. I'm going to get rid of all these old newspapers. To get out of bed on the wrong side means to be in a bad mood. He got out of the wrong side of the bed this morning and he's been horrible all day. To get your own back means to have your revenge or punish smo.
February 1, 2016
Get basically means receive. I have to get luch. I don't get what you are saying. We will get it later. It is the action of something coming into your custody, mentally or physically. When I was a kid we were not allowed to say 'get' because it is usually used to shorten a sentance rather than say exactly what you mean. I have to buy lunch still. I don't understand what you are saying. We will pick up my car later. It infers that the speaker knows what you are talking about. So it is not a word you can always use. If you were in a business meeting with some executives and said 'I don't get the presentation' they would look at you funny. If you said 'I don't understand (blah blah blah)' and were specific, it would be more normal.
February 1, 2016
THE VERB TO GET TO GET can be used in a number of patterns and has a number of meanings. TO GET + DIRECT OBJECT = TO OBTAIN, TO RECEIVE, TO BUY I got my passport last week. (to obtain) She got her driving license last week. (to obtain) They got permission to live in Switzerland. (to obtain) I got a letter from my friend in Nigeria. (to receive) He gets $1,000 a year from his father. (to receive) She got a new coat from Zappaloni in Rome. (to buy) We got a new television for the sitting room. (to buy) TO GET + PLACE EXPRESSION = REACH, ARRIVE AT A PLACE How are you getting home tonight? We got to London around 6 p.m. What time will we get there? When did you get back from New York? TO GET + ADJECTIVE = BECOME, SHOW A CHANGE OF STATE I am getting old. It's getting hotter. By the time they reached the house they were getting hungry. I'm getting tired of all this nonsense. My mother's getting old and needs looking after. It gets dark very early in the winter. Don't touch the stove until is gets cool.
February 1, 2016
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Patricia
Language Skills
English, Spanish
Learning Language
English