Harry
Why did this writer use the expression 'more positive legacy'? Houses in flames, crops stolen, and hasty graves for the dead. This was the legacy of Attila’s Huns, sweeping across northern Italy and causing massive destruction to the remains of the Roman Empire. But they unintentionally left another, more positive legacy as well. Refugees from burning cities were desperate to find safe refuge. As things got worse, more Roman citizens streamed to the wetlands to avoid the mass killings and destruction on the mainland. Why did this writer use the expression 'more positive legacy'? I think things like Houses in flames, crops stolen, and hasty graves for the dead. are negative not positive.
Feb 12, 2016 12:53 AM
Answers · 5
Hi Harry, Sounds like the next part of the passage (not included in your quote) leads us to something positive that developed when the citizens when they moved to the wetlands to flee the Huns. Indeed, I found the rest of the passage online: "Over the next few centuries they transformed the tough surroundings into an architectural wonder: Venice! Built out of misfortune, Venice eventually turned into one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the world." So, in short, this is the structure: Bad: Burning cities, etc. [Transition: BUT, there was something (unintentionally!) good to come out of the attacks.] Good: They moved to the wetlands and founded Venice. Let me know if that makes sense!
February 12, 2016
Yes the burning houses, stolen crops, and hasty graves for the dead. are negative not positive. But in contrasts, what happened as a result, the founding of Venice, was a positive legacy that the Huns did not intend.
February 12, 2016
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Harry
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English