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about "to have faith" and "to have confidence" using Hi! I'm comparing two sayings: a) I don't have much faith in words. b) I have absolutely no confidence of what I just said. Could you please tell me if I can remake them this way: "I don't have much faith of what I just said." and "I have absolutely no confidence in words"? Would that be grammatically correct? And could I say "I don't have confidence of what I said." instead of "I've no confidence of what I said"? Thank you in advance.
Oct 6, 2016 8:07 PM
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Answers · 5
Hi, a and b mean something slightly different to me and they both sound slightly odd. First: "I don't have much faith in words." I would change that to "I don't put much faith in words." I would assume you were talking about someone else's words (not your own) and that you mean that you do not believe that person without more evidence than just their words. Second - "I have absolutely no confidence of what I just said." I'd change that to "I have no confidence in what I just said." In this case I'd assume you were talking about your own plan (one that you knew was going to fail). You could say: I don't have any confidence in what I just said. or I haven't any confidence in what I just said. but stylistically, I'd prefer "I have no confidence..."
October 6, 2016
b is not grammatically correct. You don't have "confidence of" anything. You have faith or confidence IN something. You can also be confident OF something, but "confident" is not "confidence". One is an adjective, and one is a noun. I am not confident of what I just said. I have no confidence in what I just said. I am confident that Angela is a good teacher who understands the nuances of English grammar. I would put my faith in her, rather than Jeff. I wouldn't have confidence in Jeff, because I spotted several errors in his explanation. I am confident of being right about this because I have a lot of experience. EDIT: Hmmm, I don't have much confidence of being right. I think that statement is acceptable English, but you wouldn't see it often. It's an unusual way of speaking. The key here is what follows your phrase. Is it a noun, or the -ing form of a verb? I have confidence in Angela. I am confident of being right. I have no confidence of doing it well. I'm really not happy about "confidence of -ing". Maybe someone else has an opinion. I'm pretty sure I would never use it.
October 7, 2016
All are grammatically correct and semantic equivalent. However there is a slight nuance in "confidence" and "faith". Faith implies there is no logical reason to back you up but you just believe it to be so. For example, a leap in faith. "confidence" implies there is something to back you up. Now you know the subtle nuance between "I have faith in you" vs "I have confidence in you"
October 6, 2016
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Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English