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Jungdeok Choi
To find a main verb Here is a sentence I am curious about. "Second, look for more October surprises in hairpin curves in the course of the race." I can't find a main verb above. I only guess this is an imperative sentence. Let me draw an article from the news so that you can catch the context. [Quote] First, Donald Trump isn’t leaving the race, and indeed seems oblivious to the storm of criticism surrounding him. “I haven’t heard from anyone saying I should drop out, and that would never happen, never happen,” Trump told the New York Times on Saturday. “That’s not the kind of person I am. I am in this until the end.” Second, look for more October surprises in hairpin curves in the course of the race. The simultaneous leaks of Donald Trump’s lewd remarks and the publishing of excerpts from Hillary Clinton’s Goldman Sachs speeches are only the beginning. [Unquote]
Oct 9, 2016 2:27 PM
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Answers · 7
"Look" is the main verb and you are correct that this is an imperative sentence.
October 9, 2016
The main verb is "look." It is an imperative sentence. The implied subject is you, the reader. Most of the sentence is a very long description of what to look for. Let's build up a long sentence with a same pattern slowly. "Look for Saturn tonight." "Look for the planet Saturn in the sky tonight." "Look for the planet Saturn in the sky tonight, shining in the southwest as twilight fades." "Look for the planet Saturn in the sky tonight, shining in the southwest as twilight fades, with Antares twinkling 6° below it."
October 9, 2016
Hi, Jungdeok. The verb is "look." The writer is telling the reader, "Also, see what will happen in October..." in a rather imperative way (Not like, "Do it!" but more like "Let's see [together] what will happen..."
October 9, 2016
Jungdeok Choi
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English