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Artur
Can I say the same but other words or I need to use only "get + past participle/ gerund "? Both these expressions with “get” have a meaning similar ‘make something happen' Get something + past participle is used for annoying or difficult jobs that we have to deal with soon. 1) I must GET my homework DONE before the film starts. ------------------------------------------------ Get something + gerund is used when we start an action that can continue without us. 2) The teacher got the students working in pairs while she marked their homework. Can I say the same but other words or I need to use only "get + past participle/ gerund " to express these ideas? For example: 1) I must my homework DONE before the film starts. / Before the film starts I must my homework DONE. OR Before the film starts I will must have done my homework. (is it correct? Or I have to omit "must" to create sensible sentence? ) OR My homework must be done before the film starts. ("be done" passive voice?) 2) The teacher FORCE/MADE the students working in pairs while she marked their homework.
Oct 14, 2016 7:32 PM
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Answers · 6
The way you have written your first set of sentences, you must use the verb "to get," otherwise the sentence does not make sense - I must get my homework done. But you can express the same idea, more simply, by saying "I must do my homework before the film starts." Or, you could say "I have to do my homework before the film starts." Note: you have to use "to," after the verb 'have,' in the present tense but you must not use it after the verb "must." The verb "must," takes what we call the zero infinitive in English. The full infinitive of a verb includes the word "to," "to have," "to play," or "to make," for example. Some verbs, such as "must," "would," and "could," are followed directly by the verb itself without the word 'to,' in front of it. This is the zero infinitive. So, we have: I have to score more goals. I want to score more goals. but I could score more goals. I must score more goals I should score more goals. I shall score more goals. I will score more goals. Your second sentence should not use the gerund. You would say: "The teacher forced the students to work together." The construction involves the simple past tense (forced or made) and the object of the sentence (the students) is then followed by the full infinitive ("to work")
October 14, 2016
1. I agree with Andrew on everything. 2. That being said, for American English, the word "get" is primarily used in the spoken language. In writing formally for articles, college, letters, etc., "get" is usually not utilized, and more descriptive, specific words are encouraged. Andrew gave some nice options that would be used in the written language, that are specific and appropriate. :)
October 14, 2016
Artur
Language Skills
English, German, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian
Learning Language
English