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Heshel
Hello. Can we use "Ditto" as a response to "Nice to meet you"? I know already that "Ditto" is totally casual and can be used same as "me too/same here". e.g. A: I hate him. B: Ditto. But I do want to know if it is also appropriate to use "Ditto" as "you too"? 1. A: Nice to meet you. B: Ditto 2. A: Have a good time. B: Ditto Is that correct or it can only be used as "me too"?
Oct 15, 2016 5:47 PM
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Answers · 9
"Ditto" is very casual, I would say "you too" in response to "nice to meet you". I think "ditto" can sound rude to use with someone you are meeting for the first time.
October 15, 2016
Ditto is slang. If you said that to somebody when replying to "Nice to meet you" they would probably think you were rude. My favorite is 'likewise.' It sounds classy and charming to me.
October 15, 2016
No, not because of the meaning, but because it sounds unfriendly. "Ditto" is not slang. It is a perfectly good English word with a respectable Latin derivation ("dictus.") Because "ditto" means "the same words as before," if person A says "Nice to meet you," if person B says "ditto," it is the exactly same thing as if person B spoke the words "Nice to meet you." When person B says it, "you" refers to person A, so when person B says "ditto," it means "I, person B, am pleased to meet you, person A." The problem is that "ditto" is used to avoid effort and therefore suggests a lack of enthusiasm. "Ditto marks" are quotation marks, used in lists to mean "the same as the item above." One might imagine people ordering in a restaurant, and it turns out that everyone wants the same thing--the first diner says "I'll have the chicken cacciatore special," the next say "I'll have the same," and the next says "ditto" because he doesn't even want to make the effort of saying "I'll have the same." Here's a correct example of the use of "ditto." Suppose someone keeping a record of the weather every day. They might write: October 12th: Partly cloudy October 13th: " October 14th: " The marks for October 13th and 14th, in this context, are "ditto marks" and would be read aloud as "ditto." They mean that the weather on October 13th and 14th as also partly cloudy.
October 15, 2016
"Ditto" is an older slang word that is no longer in use. In most cases, if you used it, you would get a bad reaction from others. Because of these things, I suggest that you eliminate "ditto" from your English vocabulary. :)
October 15, 2016
No. It would sound stupid.
October 15, 2016
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Heshel
Language Skills
English, Persian (Farsi)
Learning Language
English