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In addition to some rare plant species, there are some precious, endangered animals on the mountain. 1. In addition to some rare plant species, there are some precious, endangered animals on the mountain. 2. In addition to some rare plant species, there are some precious and endangered animals on the mountain. Are they both correct? Are there any differences between them in meaning? Can I say "some rare species of plants" instead of "some rare plant species"? Which do you porefer? Thanks!
Oct 24, 2016 12:52 PM
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Answers · 2
1 and 2 are both fine, and there is no difference in meaning. There is a slight difference in feeling between "precious, endangered" and "precious and endangered." Most formally, you would want "precious and endangered." A list of two things normally needs a conjunction like "and" or "or." But there are some "rules" that are ok to break. When you list two adjectives, you don't always need a comma. Sometimes it gives the feeling of informality, and sometimes it gives an almost poetic feeling. And it's also more efficient, which I like. Sounds smoother. So the first one is my preference. And "some rare species of plants" and "some rare plant species" are both fine. I prefer the more economical, less wordy version: "some rare plant species."
October 24, 2016
They both are good.
October 24, 2016
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