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Renan
The usage of the word Charge. This is one of those words that seem to bare above their letters the weight of a thousand different meanings. Although I'm familiar with most of them (like charging money for a certain product, an eletric charge, magnetic charge, being in charge of some task...) few minutes ago I was watching a Hamilton documentary where Ron said "Washington gave him his first field command and he does not waste the opportunity, he led a bayonet charge" <- I'm not sure of what this means Later he says: "They charged to the parapet", and I don't really know what this means either, although I believe it is somewhat a... I don't know, they ran to the parapet? Any light on this is welcome, thanks a million
Oct 24, 2016 9:08 PM
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Answers · 3
You are right that the word has many meanings. The one that was used in the documentary in "they charged to the parapet" is a verb meaning to run towards something with an intent to damage it or overthrow it. For example, we often would describe a bull as "charging" at a bullfighter. It can also be used as a noun, describing the action. For example, the Red army made a charge at the Blue army. It would also be used as a command in war, telling the soldier to charge at the enemy --- "ready, set, charge!!!" Also, the first sentence of your post used the incorrect spelling of "bare". This word means naked or without covering, as in a bald man's head being called bare. The correct word to use is pronounced the same, but spelled "bear". So, it should be: This is one of those words that seem to bear within their letters the weight of a thousand different meanings.
October 24, 2016
Renan
Language Skills
English, French, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish
Learning Language
French, Japanese, Spanish