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John
how should I say? 1. It was pretty much ten years ago, when I was still at college. I bought my girlfriend a box of chocolate for her birthday, which burned a hole in my pocket. Or should I say, 2. I bought my girlfriend a box of chocolate, which burn a hole in my pocket, for her birthday. Of course, the chocolate I bought was expensive for me at the time. which sentence is more suitable for everyday spoken English.
Oct 25, 2016 2:31 AM
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Answers · 5
In American English, we usually only refer to "money" as burning a hole in our pockets. This basically means as fast as we get it, we spend it. I am not sure that fits in your sentence. How about, "Ten years ago, I chose to buy my girlfriend an expensive box of chocolates for her birthday, even though I really couldn't afford it." (I made an assumption as to what your main point was.) Hope this was helpful!
October 25, 2016
These sentences don't work because it hard to know what the clause "which burned a hole in my pocket" relates to. In sentence #1, it sounds like her birthday burned a hole in your pocket. In sentence #2 it sounds like the chocolate burned a hole in your pocket. The problem is that there is nothing in particular for the clause to relate to. It's a dangling modifier. Suggestions to fix: Buying a box of chocolates for my girlfriend on her birthday burned a hole in my pocket. Buying a box of chocolates for my girlfriend on her birthday ten years ago when I was still at college burned a hole in my pocket.
October 25, 2016
John
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English