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Felix
Feelings vs feeling, sentiment vs sentiments When it comes to these abstract nouns, it's always hard to choose between singular and plural form. For example: It can be beneficial to share your feelings with someone you trust. Don't let your feeling gain the upper hand over you. We appreciate and reciprocate your sentiment of being eager to make our relationship more stronger. I share your sentiments on this matter. ALL of the 'your' above are referring to one person. How do I choose their forms? Is it interchangeably? If the yours above means more than one person, should we always use the plural form? Thank you!
Oct 27, 2016 11:05 AM
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Answers · 8
To be honest I've never thought about it before, but I will add some observations: "Feelings" tend to be used when we're talking in general about our emotional state. For example: - "I share your feelings on this topic" - "Her feelings are as important as yours!" - "You really hurt his feelings" "Feeling" tends to be more specific, often using "that" or "about", and seems to most often come with the verb 'to have' along with an observation or opinion (rather than something emotional): - "I have the feeling that I'm being watched" - "I have a feeling that we're going to win the World Cup" - "I have a good feeling about my job interview" As the subject of a sentence, it almost always take the form of "My feeling is that..." followed by an opinion. Or something emotional would again refer to the plural: "My feelings were hurt yesterday". Sentiment and sentiments have a bit more of a distant/formal feeling about them, and are almost always about opinion, rather than emotions. For example you can have hurt feelings, but not hurt sentiments. If the people are plural, then the verb is the only thing changing. To take my examples above: - "I share your feelings on this topic" - "Her feelings are as important as yours!" becomes "Their feelings are as important as yours" - "You really hurt his feelings" becomes "They really hurt our feelings" - "I have the feeling that I'm being watched" becomes "They have the feeling that they're being watched" - "I have a feeling that we're going to win the World Cup" becomes "They have a feeling that they're going to win the World Cup" - "I have a good feeling about my job interview" becomes "We have a good feeling about her job interview" (the only reason I changed it to 'her' is because multiple people don't normally interview for a job) I hope that helps!
October 27, 2016
Hello Felix, the easiest way for you to decide if an abstract noun should be plural or singular, is whether it can be counted. For example. 'Feelings' - can be different on any given day. I could count how many times I felt happy with a person. Or how many times I used to feel scared when I was a child. 'Sentiment' - The young lady made a very nice sentiment of mentioning how lovely everyone had been to her in her speech. - She expressed it once, so it's singular. The nation poured out their sentiments of grief when they heard about the death of their king. 'Sentiment' becomes plural, because its being felt by more than one person.
October 27, 2016
Felix
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), Chinese (Cantonese), English, Japanese, Russian
Learning Language
English