Community Web Version Now Available
Mirra Krapivina
Complex sentences with 'which' I'm very confused with this kind of sentences. I see them very rarely but it's very natural to speak so in my primary language, so I always try to say it in English. For example here is a question: "Who is that girl you walked yesterday with?". And now I'm going to answer this question in the same fashion: That girl which I walked with was Masha. So was it gibberish or correct? And few more examples: The country which I'd like to travel to. The language which I speak. And can I say it without 'which'? The country I'd like to travel to. The language I speak. If someone who knows Russian read this, I can ask in simpler way - как перевести предложения, в которых встречаются "в котором", "к которому", "на котором", и т.д. I hope you got my idea. And thank you in advance.
Nov 3, 2016 9:52 PM
5
0
Answers · 5
Hi Mirra , You're talking about relative particles. English has three of them: that, which and who. 'That' and 'Which' mean the same thing. They are also both Russian которы. It doesn't matter which one you use, although many people might prefer 'that'. They're used to talk about objects or nouns, but not people. EX: What was the book WHICH you were reading yesterday? What was the book THAT you were reading yesterday? Who was that girl WHICH you were walking with yesterday? Who was the girl THAT you were walking with yesterday? Sometimes you don't need the relative particle and can just leave it out: What was the book you were reading yesterday? The country I'd like to travel to. The language I speak. WHO(M) is used for people. He is the guy with WHOM I was speaking.
November 3, 2016
"That girl which I walked with was Masha." It is incorrect without a doubt. "That girl WHOM I walked with was Masha." The convention observed in educated writing is to use "that" for restrictive clauses and "which" for non-restrictive, but sometimes this is not so strictly observed. Google will provide examples. In colloquial use both are often omitted. That is considered a type of ellipsis and is not favored for formal writing. If you endeavor to put the effort into perfecting your English, use a style which reflects a good university education.
November 3, 2016
Your original question has the word "that" in the wrong place. It should be: Who is the girl that you walked with yesterday?" Technically, the entire phrase (that you walked with yesterday, is said to help the listener remember which girl? The girl that you walked with yesterday, not the girl that you were with last week. If you put the word "that" in front of the word "girl", then it sounds like you are looking at the girl and are just pointing at her.
November 3, 2016
Hello Mirra. In the United States it is very common to hear sentences like these without "which". "The country I'd like to travel to..." and "The language I speak..." sound fine to me. We might also use the word "that": "The language that I speak is ..." and "The country that I'd like to travel to ..." are common as well. It is not common to hear "which" used in these kinds of sentences.
November 3, 2016
You can say it with or without the ’which,‘ but most people say it without. You can also use 'that' in the place of 'which.'
November 3, 2016
Mirra Krapivina
Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English