Dariana
What does "not go down a bundle with" mean? "A battalion of Brits behind the saucepans didn't exactly go down a bundle with the local restaurateurs, however, particularly when the sought-after star came Neat's way. " https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2000/mar/10/features11.g2
Nov 21, 2016 6:50 PM
Answers · 5
You need to look at the whole paragraph: A battalion of Brits behind the saucepans didn't exactly go down a bundle with the local restaurateurs, however, particularly when the sought-after star came Neat's way. The reaction from the local trade was, he concedes, "underwhelming". But his customers - the congress business, a highly enthusiastic British community, and a small but growing band of Frenchmen - are delighted. British cooks and chefs in France, who even win prizes, are understandably not popular among French cooks since the French kitchen is looked up to, while the English kitchen is looked down upon. As regards your second question, I don''t know. I found his web site: http://www.marcopierrewhite.co/ Some Brits can surely give you an explanation.
November 21, 2016
The English in this sentence is very casual. Some might say - very bad. It is paraphrasing the term "to go down well" meaning to be well received. "A bundle" means "a lot". So it's saying the British chef's weren't popular amongst the locals. The great unwashed is often used to describe the working class.
November 21, 2016
It means it was not popular, I would think. We use the expression "did not go down well," much more frequently. We also use the phrase "It went down like a lead balloon," for something that people have reacted badly to.
November 21, 2016
And what does "the great unwashed " Marco Pierre White mean?
November 21, 2016
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Dariana
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, French, Russian
Learning Language
Chinese (Mandarin), English, French