dwellpei
About the Article of spare the spider Spiders are busy for at least half the year in killing insects. It is impossible to make more than the wildest guess at how many they kill, but they are hungry creatures, not content with only three meals a day. look at this sentence , i cant understand that ,how can i use this sentence "It is impossible to guess at how many they kill "displace this "It is impossible to make more than the wildest guess at how many they kill" ,what is the “make more than the wildest guess” mean?
Nov 22, 2016 4:08 AM
Answers · 8
It's impossible to make a guess more accurate than the best guess normally possible in cases like this, which unfortunately is a very wild guess (meaning, in this case, a very "inaccurate" guess, made "at random"; it's just an "attempt" to guess with nothing to base the guess on). In other words: "it's impossible to make a better guess than one that is very "at random". It's just a way to make things a little more complicated, but the meaning is what you've written: "it's impossible to guess at how many they kill".
November 22, 2016
A “wild guess” is a guess or an estimate made with very little or no information. The sentence means that we really have no idea how many insects spiders kill. Here, the implication is that spiders kill a lot more insects than we can keep track of. BTW, I always spare spiders in my home. There’s also a gecko (or two) that’s moved in with me — they also love eating insects, and have interesting superpowers.
November 22, 2016
If it's difficult to be understood, I will just summarize my answer: "it's impossible to make a better guess than one that is very inaccurate". "One" is a pronoun used in order not to repeat the word "guess". You could also say: "it's impossible to make a better guess than a guess that is very inaccurate". Then it follows: ...at how many they kill. So the meaning is: It's impossible to guess at how many they kill.
November 22, 2016
Well, the structure is complicated but very interesting, it's a comparative form with a superative in the part of the comparison after "than".
November 22, 2016
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dwellpei
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English