Guille
Pal - possible meanings Hi everyboy, According to the Cambridge Dictionary, the word "PAL" can be used either as a synonym of "friend" or a way of addressing "a man who is annoying you". The thing is, how can I tell the difference? Is it more common for this word to be used in a friendly or unfriendly way? Also, is it used all around English speaking countries? Or just in America? Thanks in advance!
Nov 27, 2016 1:36 PM
Answers · 4
Normally it´s a friendly word.
November 27, 2016
In the example in the dictionary is: Look, XXXXXX, you are annoying me. You could use pal, friend, buddy, your friend´s name, etc in this sentence. You are telling your friend (or a stranger) that they are bothering you.
November 27, 2016
It's more of an American word but of course, it's understood everywhere. It means 'friend' or 'buddy' but in the UK that second usage is more prevalent. It's a subtle way of insulting someone lol. People sometimes do the same thing with 'buddy' here. The context would make it obvious. As an example of what I'm referring to: Look, pal, I don't care what you think... Listen, buddy, you don't have a clue what you're talking about... The surrounding words make it pretty clear that the person in question is not their pal. The tone of voice would make it clear too.
November 27, 2016
Hey there, Guille. I am from California, in the US, and I haven't heard people use "pal" to refer to an annoying person. Cambridge books, however, are British publications, so I imagine it must be used that way in the UK. To answer your question, you can tell the difference by the context. For example, if someone is speaking with a sarcastic tone, they problem mean 'annoying person', but if they sound genuine, they likely mean 'friend'.
November 27, 2016
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Guille
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