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The English grammar question You're no different than anybody else is. As far as I am concerned,noun follows no and adjective follows not. If no and not have the same usage here, we always say you're not different from anybody else. No idea about this sentence.Thank you.
Dec 4, 2016 7:41 AM
Answers · 7
This is not "no" meaning "not", this is another word: it means "not any". Furthermore, this is a particular form of "any": it's an ADVERB, and it means: "even a small amount". Since here we have "not any", it means: "NOT EVEN A SMALL AMOUNT DIFFERENT", or "IN NO WAY DIFFERENT". As you know, adverbs "modify" the meaning of verbs, adjectives (like in this case with "different"), other adverbs and whole clauses. However, keep in mind that the adverb "ANY" (or "NOT ANY" or "NO") is usually used with comparative adjectives (any faster, no better, etc). "Different" (not a comparative form) is an exception.
December 4, 2016
Thank you very much.
December 4, 2016
This form can be used with any comparative adjective or adverb. It can be used in questions too, not just in negative, for instance: "is she any better?" The only non-comparative forms that can come with "any" as an adverb are the 2 adjectives "different" and "good".
December 4, 2016
Yeah, I get it. Thank you very much. Any special adjectives like different?
December 4, 2016
I've got aware that in your question you mentioned that "noun follows no". That's true when "no" is a determiner, but in the sentence you mentioned it's an adverb.
December 4, 2016
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Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), Chinese (Cantonese), English
Learning Language
Chinese (Cantonese), English