Ирина
Albeit Is the word "albeit" correctly used in the following sentence? : I haven't taken active holidays for ages. Albeit I used to do it quite often as a child.
Dec 14, 2016 6:36 AM
Answers · 5
No; "albeit" doesn't begin a sentence. Your sentence should read, "Although I used to do so..." Keep in mind that the word is a condensed phrase: "although it be".
December 14, 2016
OED usage examples: 2004 JazzTimes Apr. 115/1 ‘Bridges’ is a..delight..albeit one has to be ready for the jazzified force of drummer and percussionist Jamey Haddad. 1995 Animals' Voice Spring 13/1 Young skunks begin to spray, albeit inaccurately, at about one month of age. The most basic dictionaries state this: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/albeit albeit conjunction UK ​ /ɔːlˈbiː.ɪt/ US ​ /ɑːlˈbiː.ɪt/ formal C2 although: The evening was very pleasant, albeit a little quiet. He tried, albeit without success. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/albeit Definition of albeit : conceding the fact that : even though : although Origin and Etymology of albeit Middle English, literally, all though it be As created during the Depression by a promoter named Leo Seltzer, roller derby was the first sport in which men and women competed on the same team, albeit on a separate-but-equal basis, alternating periods on the track. —Frank Deford, New York Times Magazine, 4 Jan. 1998 … customers seemed generally cheery, albeit some were more cautious than others … —Cynthia Clark, Publishers Weekly, 26 Jan. 1998 But suppose the life were in many ways a mess, albeit a fascinating, courageous, picturesque and emotionally intense mess … —Diane Ackerman, New York Times Book Review, 23 Aug. 1987 http://www.dictionary.com/browse/albeit?s=t conjunction although; even if: a peaceful, albeit brief retirement. It struck me that Charles has, albeit unwittingly, accelerated the tendency for the bad to drive out the good. Regards, Peter
December 21, 2016
I enjoyed the questions and answers! Just a small comment. According to the OED, albeit does not mean "although it be" -- it means although. The etymology is "although it be" albeit the meaning is "although": Etymology: < all conj. + be , present subjunctive of be v. + it pron. 1. Introducing a finite clause: though it is true that; even though; although. Origin: Formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: all conj., be v., it pron. Etymology: < all conj. + be , present subjunctive of be v. + it pron. ... (Show More) 1. Introducing a finite clause: though it is true that; even though; although. http://www.oed.com.ezproxy.neu.edu/view/Entry/4594?redirectedFrom=albeit#eid
December 21, 2016
No, I don't think so. As mentioned, "albeit" is not the same as "although". It is "although it be" - it includes the subject+verb after "although". Because of this, it can only further qualify (lessen) the idea already mentioned, without repeating the verb part. So I don't think your example can be said with "albeit - it's saying two related things, not further qualifying the same thing. A different example I can think of is: - I finally managed to take holidays, albeit just for one short week. == I finally managed to take holidays, although it was just for one short week. ("although it was" = "albeit")
December 14, 2016
Yes, albeit is a subordinate conjunction, so this is a sentence fragment: Albeit I used to do it quite often as a child. You could also solve the problem like this: I haven't taken active holidays for ages albeit I used to do it quite often as a child. That's the grammar solution. But stylistically, it's rare to hear this; it sounds excessively formal. I would go with although.
December 14, 2016
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Ирина
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English, German, Russian
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