Jordana
Question Hi, there Could you help me with four questions? Please! 1) Let us say you are going you are walking and you say "I will walk just as far as there, and then I will start running." Is this odd? 2) Does it sound odd to say "at&t does phone, TV and Internet"? ... And what's a bundle when you are talking about cable TV providers, etc? 3)Let us say you are talking abot a road and showing it on a map and you say: "This road runs(is) level up to/as far as here, and then it runs upwards." Does it sound odd? What could you say instead? As far as? 4) Finally, do you say "on the upper part of the map" or "in the lower part of the map"? and "I feel a pain in the upper part of my arm or on the upper part of my arm"? Thank you very much!
Feb 7, 2017 5:57 PM
Answers · 6
Q1. Let us say you are going you are walking and you say "I will walk just as far as there, and then I will start running." Is this odd? A. "I will walk as far as there and then I will start running" or "I will walk just to there and then I will start running" Q2. Does it sound odd to say "at>t does phone, TV and Internet"? ... And what's a bundle when you are talking about cable TV providers, etc? A. I don't quite understand the "at>t" part of this sentence. The word 'bundle' is often used to describe the various aspects of the package that you have bought. For example, a mobile phone contract may come 'bundled' with free minutes, text messages and/or data. A TV package may come with free movies, sport, etc and this may be sold as a 'bundle' or 'package'. Q3. Let us say you are talking abot a road and showing it on a map and you say: "This road runs(is) level up to/as far as here, and then it runs upwards." Does it sound odd? What could you say instead? As far as? A. "This road runs level up to here/as far as here and then it goes uphill" Either would work. 'As far as here' is a little better grammatically. Q4. Finally, do you say "on the upper part of the map" or "in the lower part of the map"? and "I feel a pain in the upper part of my arm or on the upper part of my arm"? A. You can say "the upper part of the map", however, we tend to use the compass to describe a map so you would more likely say "the northern part of the map" or "the southern part of the map".
February 7, 2017
1) Your usage isn't strictly incorrect, but it sounds awkward. You'll more often see, "I will walk to there, then start running." We drop the duplicate "I will", the 'and', and the "as far as". These words are all implicit in the sentence. 2) This is perfectly fine. Sometimes you'll see 'provides' instead of 'does', but it only really changes the level of formality. A bundle is a group of things attached together. When we talk about service bundles, we are saying that multiple services are combined (usually at a lower cost), all with the same contract. So AT&T* would offer their all-in-one bundle, which provides phone, TV, and internet all in the same contract. 3) The only thing I would change about this sentence is the part after the 'and'. I would say, "and then it begins to climb." The first part of the sentence works with either 'runs' or 'is' and with either "up to" or "as far as". 4) Use "on the upper part of the map". As far as your arm goes, you use whichever more accurately describes the situation. If someone punched you, you probably feel pain *in* your upper arm. If a bug bit you, you probably feel itchy *on* the upper part of your arm. Usage of 'in' is much more common, since pain is always in your body, not on your body. More often though, people will just say, "My upper arm hurts!" *Strangely, italki filters the ampersand (&) into a pointed bracket (>).
February 7, 2017
I'm on it! Give me a few minutes...
February 7, 2017
Please, can anybody help me?
February 7, 2017
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