Claudia
Would you help me understand this sentence? "C'mon, Leslie," he said, and then he made himself turn and give Janice Avery one of those look-overs from frizz blond hair, past too tight blouse and broad-beamed jeans, to gigantic sneakers. "Don't look like there'll be room across the back here for you and Janice Avery." --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- What's 'make himself turn' mean? And I don't understand this whole phrase, "give Janice Avery one of those look-overs from frizz blond hair, past too tight blouse and broad-beamed jeans, to gigantic sneakers." What's 'look-overs' mean? And in the last sentence, "Don't look like" what subject is abbreviated? Thank you in advance!
Feb 14, 2017 3:08 PM
Answers · 4
made himself turn = forced his body to turn a look-over = in this case, a full look at the other person from top (her frizz-blond hair) to bottom (gigantic sneakers) "It doesn't look like ..." The "it" is an impersonal subject to denote the situation in general.
February 14, 2017
Hello Claudia, If he says 'made himself turn' it shows that he put effort into it rather than just did it. A "look-over" is a look from top to toe in this context. In the last part the language has been strangled a bit. It should read "It doesn't look like there will be room ..." This is how some people speak when they are either being lazy or they haven't had a good education. Best wishes Bob
February 14, 2017
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