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Is this sentence grammatically OK? ''She exercises so that she will remain healthy.'' Last week my students asked me if they could use ''so that'' and ''will'' instead of ''to'' to express purpose. I was not sure whether it's correct or not. I would be grateful if you helped me with this.
Feb 26, 2017 8:39 PM
Answers · 11
The sentence makes sense, but "She exercises to remain healthy" is more concise and sounds a bit better.
February 26, 2017
Yes, it is perfectly good grammar and also not uncommon to be used.
February 26, 2017
Hi Ghasedek, Your sentence is grammatically sound. You are using "so that" to indicate purpose or cause and effect Xxx (action/cause) so that YYy (result/effect). Action: She exercises. Effect: She will remain healthy. Hope this helps. Cheers,Lance
February 26, 2017
Yes, both are ok. In addition, sometimes we omit "that". So a third option would be: ''She exercises so she will remain healthy.''
February 26, 2017
It's grammatically fine, but more of a mouthful instead of "to remain". It's OK in formal literary English, but in regular English it sounds like a few unnecessary words are in the phrase. If your lesson was on infinitives of purpose, then the student should be practising that.
February 26, 2017
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