Mikhail
come along or come I cannot understand most frequently meaning expression "come along". For examples: 1) "They said it's good if I come along." 2) "You can come along if you want." My translator translates it like "come along with smb" but for me I could translate these sentances both ways like just "come" or like "come along with smb". and there are a lof of examples when used come along in meaning just come, and I cannot understand could I use in these cases just come withount alon and what difference between come and come along in these cases... Examples: 1) "anybody could come along and build new technology" 2) "Particularly when some engineer has come along with the answer." 3) "A new technology will come along to fix the messes we made with the last one." for me, in all these cases, I could use just come. My questions are: 1) What difference between come and come along? 2) Could I use come instead come along almost cases "come along with"?
Nov 4, 2017 4:48 PM
Answers · 3
As Terasee said, "come along" = "come with smb" or "appear in the future" nothing else. as for your examples: 1) "anybody could COME ("along" if you mean "appear", so will depend on the context) and build new technology" 2) "Particularly when some engineer has COME UP with the answer." 3) "A new technology will COME ALONG to fix the messes we made with the last one."
November 4, 2017
Thanks for your answer, but if I will start to use in all cases instead come just come along, I think for some cases it will sound a little bit strange, so where is boundary between these?
November 4, 2017
This is a really good question: to come along means to come with or come together with. It also can mean - to come in the future such as technology. In the cases you stated above... You could use just the word COME and be perfectly understood. :-) Teacher Terasee/701185
November 4, 2017
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Mikhail
Language Skills
English, German, Russian
Learning Language
English, German