Sanya
Do you think the clause "only when certain of a person’s heritage" is complete? Residents of any of these countries may be called "British." Use "English," "Scot" or "Scotsman," "Welsh" and "Irish" or "Northern Irish" only when certain of a person’s heritage. I suppose that "is concerned" could be omitted in the clause "only when certain of a person’s heritage". How do you think about it? Thank you!
Nov 7, 2017 7:19 AM
Answers · 5
No, it would need 'is concerned', it is not a complete sentence otherwise.
November 7, 2017
Because "when" is a conjunction, it should be followed by a sentence. “ Only when certain of a person’s heritag“ is a phrase, so I suppose that it could be written like this "...only when certain of a person’s heritage is concerned".
November 7, 2017
I'm confused by your question. The phrase "is concerned" is not in the clause. It also doesn't belong there. The sentence is fine as is.
November 7, 2017
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Sanya
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English