Jordana
Questions(please) Hi, there Could you help me with two questions? 1) In the book "Animal Farm", I came across this sentence: Do you say "Why then we continue in this miserable condition? Because nearly the whole of the produce of our labour is stolen from us by human beings.". Why "The whole of"? Couldn't you say "Because nearly the whole produce of our labour is stolen from us by human beings"? 2) 1) Would you say "Not with all the soap in the world, nor with all the cosmetics will these wrinkles ever go away" or "Neither with all the soap in the world, nor with all the cosmetics will these wrinkles ever go away" ? Thank you very much!!!
Nov 11, 2017 11:12 PM
Answers · 2
Hello Jordana, I hope you're doing well. 1. 'the whole of' and 'whole' "When you talk about the whole of something, you mean all of it. We were there for the whole of July. I felt pain throughout the whole of my body. Instead of using the whole of in front of a noun phrase beginning with the, you can simply use whole after the. For example, instead of saying 'The whole of the house was on fire', you can say 'The whole house was on fire'." Best regards
November 11, 2017
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