Lina Lin
"arm-round-the-book" - can someone explain the phrase, please? hi! reading a book about education. don't understand the phase. the hole sentence is here: "The emphasis in the class is on co-operation rather than competition; the "arm-round-the-book" mentality is discouraged, and since there are no class places for merit, a child's success in no way depends on another's relative lack of it. Thank you!!!the context: "There are other ways of trying to help the slower pupils and to provide more scope for the gifted. The emphasis in the class is on co-operation rather than competition; the "arm-round-the-book" mentally is discouraged, and since there are no class places for merit, a child's success in no way depends on another's relative lack of it"
Nov 26, 2017 4:33 PM
Answers · 6
It might be helpful if you could provide a little more context Lina Lin. If you have your arm around something, it usually means you are trying to protect something or perhaps to hold onto old-fashioned ideas (metaphorically speaking in both cases). I imagine the full text is arguing against grouping students based on exam scores or something like that, right? The meaning depends on which book they're referring to; is it the textbook? the rule book?
November 26, 2017
Hi, Lina Lin I am not quite sure, but I think it might mean, "to be studying all the time and be the best." It is this kind of mentality that the author might be referring to. Maybe someone else knows for sure.
November 26, 2017
Whole not hole arm-round-the-book??? new to me maybe should be arm-up-the-back?
November 26, 2017
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