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Wie Kwangil
Anyone can explain this? Commodore Norrington and Governor Swann walked along the parapet that surrounded Fort Charles. On one side was the Caribbean, and on the other a court yard, from which the shadow of the gallows could be made out. The two men were lost in thought as they paced, their hands behind their backs. In the second sentence, would it be strange if i write "On one side was the Caribbean, and on the other a court yard, which the shadow of the gallows could be made out." ?? i deleted "from"... and in this situation, how is it different between ",which" and ",from which"???
Feb 9, 2008 6:10 AM
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Answers · 4
thank you!
February 9, 2008
Josephine is correct ... in the phrase "from which," "from" is a preposition describing WHERE the shadows were seen. The sentence must use "from which" because "the shadows" are seen FROM the the court yard, it is not describing the cout yard itself. (Here you can replace "from which" with "where," but not "which"): On one side was the Caribbean, and on the other a court yard, WHERE the shadow of the gallows could be made out.
February 9, 2008
i wonder the difference of meaning between them. not to think about grammer.
February 9, 2008
i think "from" is a preposition here,so,u cant delete it.
February 9, 2008
Wie Kwangil
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English