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Rozaliya
Present perfect tense and present continious tense. Hello! How can I understand in "present perfect" and "present perfect continious" that an action is still continuing or ended? Which words can help me in understanding of it?
Aug 12, 2018 1:07 PM
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Answers · 6
Present continous - For an action that has started but not yet finished. I am drinking coffee (now). = I started drinking coffee (a few minutes ago). I am drinking coffee (now). I will finish drinking eventually (in a few minutes). I am reading a book (this week). = I started reading (a few days ago). I may or may not be reading now. I will finish eventually (in a few days). I am studying Spanish (this year). = I started studying (a few months ago). I may or may not be studying now. I will finish eventually (in a year, in two years, ...). Present perfect continuous - For an action that has started but not yet finished I have been drinking coffee since five minutes ago. = I started drinking coffee five minutes ago. I am drinking coffee (now). I will finish drinking eventually (in a few minutes). I have been reading a book for a few days. = I started reading a few days ago. I may or may not be reading now. I will finish eventually ( in a few days). I have been studying Spanish for a few months. = I started studying a few months ago. I may or may not be studying now. I will finish eventually (in a year, in two years, ...). Past perfect - For a completed action at an unspecified time during a period up to the present (an open time period). - I have drunk enough coffee. I don't want any more. = I started drinking coffee. I finished drinking coffee. During an unspecified period up to the present. - I have read two books this month. = I started and finished reading two books. This month isn't finished yet. I might read a third book. Another use of the present perfect - For an ongoing state or repetitive action that has occurred during a period of time up to the present. - My brother is sick. = ongoing state - My brother has been sick for a week. - It snows in Canada during the winter. = repeating action - It has snowed every winter for the last 10 years.
August 12, 2018
Hello Rozaliya, I hope you are well. The present perfect continuous tense is used to talk about a continuous, but not necessarily finished action or situation. The present perfect tense is used to talk about a finished action or situation. Compare: I have been gardening since morning. (Focus on continuity) I have planted several new saplings. (Focus on completion) I have been reading since morning. (Focus on continuity) I have read two books since morning. (Focus on completion) Temporary and permanent The present perfect continuous tense is used to talk about more temporary actions and situations; the present perfect tense is used to talk about longer-lasting or permanent situations. That boy has been standing at the gate for hours. (Temporary action or situation) The temple has stood on the hill for hundreds of years. (Longer-lasting or permanent situation) Answer the following questions using the hints given in the brackets: What have you been doing since morning? …………………………………………….. (learning my lessons) . How has he been feeling since he took that medicine? ………………………………………… (much better). What has Dad been doing all morning? …………………………………………….. (reading). Have you been following the developments closely? …………………………………… (yes). For whom have you been working so hard? ……………………………………………… (my kids). If you need any materials I can send you some links. Kind regards, Teacher Kirsty
August 12, 2018
Thank you again.
August 12, 2018
This is also a great video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVcF43V9j88
August 12, 2018
Rozaliya
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