StevenBY
"Get to" VS "be allowed to" Hi, teachers and friends Regarding "Get to" VS "be allowed to" Is there any nuance between the two? can they be used interchangeably in any situation? I've noticed native speakers sometimes using GET TO while sometimes using the other one to mean roughly the same thing (I might be wrong) I know "get to" can also mean arrive at, so please don't bother pointing this out. Thank you.
Aug 14, 2018 6:20 PM
Answers · 12
Get thee to a nunnery? :) Can also mean go to. (Old English) . I did not get to eat my cake. <-- maybe I was interrupted. Cause unknown. It was time for bed, maybe. I was not allowed to eat my cake. <-- someone told me that I could not eat it. Forbidden. . Time did not allow going into this more fully. <-- almost the same We ran out of time, so I did not get to explain further.
August 14, 2018
"Get to" has to do with the circumstances surrounding the stated action. The thing that allows (or prevents) a given action is not based upon receiving permission. "Allowed to" has to do with permission. An example using both (with "get to" being used in the negative): "My father said I was allowed to watch my favorite television show, but we arrived home so late that the show was already over and I did not get to watch it." So in the example above, the father gives the speaker permission (allow to), but the circumstances of arriving home too late at night deny the speaker the opportunity (did not get to). [Note that my example would be considered overly wordy in English. A more concise way to say the same thing would be: "My father said I was allowed to watch my favorite television show, but we arrived home so late I didn't get to." (or even better, "I missed it")] I hope that helps!
August 14, 2018
Good question! They are mostly interchangeable... but not quite, sometimes "get to" gets used to communicate "able to." Like, "I didn't get to make a salad before the party." In that case, being allowed/having permission may or may not be relevant- maybe because I ended up being too busy to cook anything, or maybe because I was denied permission to make salad (although I don't know why anyone would say no to that!) :)
August 14, 2018
If someone says, "I can get to the party after all" they mean they will be able to fit it into their schedule. Perhaps they have unexpected time off work or other plans fell through, so they "get to go" to the party. This is a matter of ARRANGEMENT or scheduling. If someone says, "they are allowed to go to the party" this involves PERMISSION. Perhaps a teenager has permission from his parents and has now been allowed to go. Hope this helps.
August 14, 2018
Get thee to a nunnery? :) Can also mean go to. (Old English) . I did not get to eat my cake. <-- maybe I was interrupted. Cause unknown. It was time for bed, maybe. I was not allowed to eat my cake. <-- someone told me that I could not eat it. Forbidden. . Time did not allow going into this more fully. <-- almost the same We ran out of time, so I did not get to explain further.
August 15, 2018
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