Ezzat Yaseen
Whom vs Who Me: When we meet with people (who) we know nothing about. The correction: When we meet with people (whom) we know nothing about. How to choose either who or whom in such a sentence?
Aug 16, 2018 9:18 PM
Answers · 9
This is a good explanation: Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”' or “'she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence. Source: Grammarly.com
August 16, 2018
In spoken English, "whom" has become rare. The man who called you this morning is my brother. The man who you called this morning is my brother. (To actually use whom in spoken English will mark you as an English teacher or as a foreigner who studied grammar very carefully.) In careful, written English, "who" is a subject and "whom" is an object. The man who called you this morning is my brother. The man whom you called this morning is my brother.
August 16, 2018
Darren is correct for American English. Chris is correct for British English.
August 17, 2018
Thanks
August 17, 2018
As Chris says, depends on whether you want to be technically right, or sound like everyone else.
August 17, 2018
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