simba0722
Is it correct to say this? 1. You will find nothing in her which equals or comes close to your expectation made by her story. 2. You will find nothing in her that equals or comes close to what she masks you expect from her. 3. You will find nothing in her which equals or comes close to what you would anticipate something from her. 4. You might have found nothing in her which equals or comes close to what you had been led to expect by her story.
Aug 23, 2018 12:03 PM
Answers · 6
Here are some suggestions that sound more natural. 1. You will find nothing in her which equals or comes close to your expectation. 2. You will find nothing in her that equals or comes close to what she lead you to expect. 3. You will find nothing in her which equals or comes close to what you anticipated from her. 4. You might not find anything in her to equal or come close to what you had been led to expect by her story. Hope this helps
August 23, 2018
They all sort of convey the idea well, but not 2 because of the "she masks" her true self from you. All your sentences begin the same, "you will find nothing in her which/that equals or comes close to...." The best answer is #4 "comes close to what you had been led to believe/expect by her story". #4 is the most natural sounding sentence: because her story leads you to expect/imaging her to be XYZ when, in fact, she is different from what you expect, from what the story lead you to believe. For #2
August 23, 2018
I sincerely thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. All the comments you gave help me to understand the points I wanted to clear up. I really appreciate it.
August 24, 2018
1) "your expectation made by her story" sounds odd. She can't just "make your expectations". 2) Okay (with "masks" changed to "makes"). "what she makes you expect from here" seems more reasonable. 3) Wrong. "what you would anticipate something from her" is ungrammatical because of "something", and "anticipate" doesn't seem like the best word here. 4) Good. The sentence appears to me too long and complicated for what it says, though. "which equals or comes close to" sounds overblown in this context. I would say it more succinctly, like so, for example: - You might not find in her anything you have been led to expect by her story. - You might fail to find in her what you have come to expect listening to her stories.
August 23, 2018
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