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Beebee
Can I replace concise with laconic?
Aug 23, 2018 5:18 PM
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No. "Laconic" is much more specific than "concise". it means "concise, in a lazy, funny way". She asked "Do you like the way this dress makes me look?" "No," he answered laconically. I asked the sacred teacher how many truths I needed to learn before I could call myself wise. "Three," he answered laconically. He refused to explain what he had said. All laconic sentences are concise, but only about 5% of concise sentences are laconic.
August 23, 2018
You could substitute the word "concise" with either "succinct" or "terse". They all mean speaking in a manner that is brief and most importantly, TO THE POINT. Succinct means all unnecessary details have been removed. Terse suggests a more forceful manner of speaking. The word "laconic", however, often suggests that so few words are spoken that there might be a LACK of clarity. Hope this helps
August 23, 2018
Laconic refers to speaking lazily. Concise refers to being brief and contained in a short document etc. you would not usually say someone wrote or delivered a laconic speech. Unless you knowingly wished to accuse them of being lazy, or not being able to write or deliver a proper speech. You would say they wrote or delivered a concise speech.
August 23, 2018
No. "Laconic" refers to speech. "Concise" usually refers to written material, and means "expressing a lot of information, accurately, in a small number of words or pages." Here is an example of a use of the word "laconic." "President Calvin Coolidge was a laconic man, known by the nickname 'Silent Cal.' At a dinner party, the hostess said to him, 'I have a bet with my husband. He says that I can't get you to say three words. I bet that I can.' Coolidge said 'You lose.'" Here is an example of a use of the word "concise." "'The Elements of Style,' by Strunk and White, is only seventy pages long. But, though concise, it is one of the best guides to English composition you could ever read."
August 23, 2018
No. <-- laconic The answers below are concise for the question. :)
August 23, 2018
Beebee
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