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Muhammed Qasim
"I'd rather you explained to her why we can't go", I'd is I had? In the below sentence "I'd" is a contraction of "I had", not "I would"? - I'd rather you explained to her why we can't go
Sep 6, 2018 4:17 PM
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Answers · 7
Hey Muhammed, how are you? I hope you are doing just fine! * May I provide you with information on the usage of the idiom ''would rather''? Firstly, you should know that the ''I'd rather'', used in the context concerned, is a contraction of ''I would rather''. On average, when we speak about a specific preference (our preference now), ''would rather'' and ''would prefer'' have the same meaning and are interchangeable. --> Would rather can be abbreviated to 'd rather . --> Would prefer can be abbreviated to 'd prefer : E.g.: ''We went to the theatre yesterday; today I would rather go to the cinema''. E.g.: ''We went to the theatre yesterday; today I would prefer to go to the cinema''. ** NOTE: We say: 1) would rather . . . than... 2) would prefer . . . rather than or would prefer . . . instead of... E.g.: ''It's such nice weather – I 'd rather sit in the garden than watch TV''. E.g.: ''It's such nice weather – I 'd prefer to sit in the garden rather than watch TV''. E.g.: ''It's such nice weather – I 'd prefer to sit in the garden instead of watching TV''. *** We use a past tense after ''would rather'' when we speak about the actions of other people, even though that action may be in the present or future: E.g.: ''I'd rather you took a taxi (instead of walking) – it's not safe on the streets at night''. E.g.: ''The film is quite violent. I'd rather our children didn't watch it''. Hope that helps!!! :)
September 7, 2018
The "I'd rather" here is a contraction of I would rather. It has two different constructions: 1) A sentence with the same subjects, "would rather" is followed by the base form of verb. 2) A sentence with different subjects, "would rather" is followed by the simple past clause. E.g.: 1) (+) I'd rather work at home than go out tonight. (-) I'd rather not go out tonight. 2) (+) I'd rather you worked at home tonight. (-) I'd rather you didn't go out tonight. Hope they help, Tere
September 6, 2018
Hi Muhammed, "I'd" rather" in this sentence is a contraction of "I would" rather. Regards, Sinead
September 6, 2018
Muhammed Qasim
Language Skills
English, Punjabi, Urdu
Learning Language
English