chappyrick0705
Could you correct or improve my writing (with some added vocab or expressions)? I went back to Japan last month and spent a couple of weeks in Tokyo. There were a few guests I needed to meet up with, and they were arriving at Narita airport the early morning of the next day, so I stayed at a hotel near the airport. I always love to stay at different hotels. Even when I have two pieces of stuffed large suitcase with me, I switch hotels every night to enjoy the different experiences. That night, I really wanted to give myself the most important mission to exfoliate my entire body that had become extremely dirty from the six month worth of sweat in the Philippines. So, I went to a local onsen, or communal public bath. Inside of it is a wide selection of different types of bathtub, with showers individually lining up for a personal use. You get your own spot and take a shower to wash all the dirt off of your body before going into the bathtub. This prevents the water in the bathtub from getting dirty, and it allows it to stay clean for the people coming next.
Sep 13, 2018 1:33 PM
Answers · 4
Oh I did not know that! Thank you!
September 13, 2018
You'll have more response if you post long passages like this under Community/Notebook rather than Answers.
September 13, 2018
There was a family of foreigners, who very much looked like Filipinos (and they were, actually). I could spot their nationality because I've lived in the Philippines in the past 7 months and was kind of already familiarized with the way they behave. What took me by surprise was the way the two of their kids was doing in the bathtub. I know sometimes kids get rambunctious out of excitement, but they were running around inside of the bath where there were also other people quietly bathing in. The kids got so carried away to the point where they splash the bath water to the other people's faces and remain nonchalant. These people had a very confused look, which I totally understand, but what I didn't understand is that they wipe the water off their face and just stay there without batting an eye about the kids' behavior. If it had happened in a different country, like the Philippines or America, I wouldn't have been able to pluck up the courage to approach them, but here is my home country and knew what I was supposed to do. I could not stand for any more of this misconduct, so instead of talking to the kids, I approached the parents (just to be clear, there were two fathers; one father for one kid, and one father for the other. I think these two fathers were friends).
September 13, 2018
I spoke to them in English and said "Hi, I think you should tell your kids to quiet down. Everyone is looking at you guys." The parents said "Oh.. I'm sorry." They told their kids to be nice, but perhaps the parents knew that they won't, so the parents exited out the path and went to the shower section. It didn't take me a second to notice why they did that; I think they tried to go somewhere else where they can get away from their responsibility to rein them in, which otherwise they had to do if they'd stayed in the same bathtub. The kids were, albeit a bit better, still running around. What do you think? Do you think you'd talk to the parents twice, three times, until finally they take a decisive action to put an end to their kid's misbehavior? I'm curious about what you would actually say to them!
September 13, 2018
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